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Wade on the Trail with his dog

Spring has sprung and woodland wildflowers are showing their faces throughout the wooded ravines of the Quad Cities. Let’s Move Outdoor Blogger, Teri Stickler, and her beloved pooch, Kaia, take us on a tour right along an old Bettendorf trail.

By Teri Stickler and her Samoyed, Kaia

Spring is here and we find ourselves in the oak forest of Bettendorf’s first city park. In 1937 the Bettendorf Park Board purchased 40 acres of land bordering Duck Creek. There is no firm understanding as to the naming of this park, but some rumor that Devils Glen got its name from Native American beliefs that a devil lived in its limestone caves.

“There is pleasure in the pathless woods…”  Lord Byron

Located just off State Street, on Devil’s Glen Road in Bettendorf, the park is easy to find by car, bike, or foot. It offers visitors exceptional views with its exposed limestone bluffs hugging Duck Creek. There is even a small waterfall along the Duck Creek Recreation Trail. Amenities include three shelters, (one reservable,) including grills and electricity. Also provided are public restrooms, a large fire pit, a playground, a disc golf course, and a Little League Ball Field.

Kaia and I often come to Devil’s Glen Park. Here one can get on the Duck Creek Recreation Trail and walk or bike all the way (13.5 miles out and back) to Emeis Park, Davenport or go the other way and meet up with the Mississippi Riverfront Trail (MRT). Click here for a handy, digital map. (The link will open in a new tab or window.)

Kaia and I generally just hang out in the park.

Spring has sprung.

We find springtime to be doubly rewarding as the wooded area gradually bursts with spring wildflowers. Bloodroot, snowdrops, spring beauty, hepatica, May apple, Dutchman’s breeches, all make their presence known as do the Prairie trillium that literally blankets the entire forest floor. We can barely avoid stepping on the trillium. (note: We never pick the wildflowers. They are protected species and, in some instances, even picking one flower can literally kill the entire plant.) As spring progresses, more wildflowers will appear.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Wild geranium, trout lily (dogtooth violet), sweet William, cut-leaved toothwort, Virginia waterleaf are just a few that can be found. Kaia and I like to walk slowly and take our time. For me, I am usually trying to capture some of the beauty with photography while Kaia prefers to explore every tree and fallen log, keeping an ear tuned to movement and, of course, squirrels!

And I have not even mentioned all the birds one can see and hear. The woodpeckers, for one, rap out their own presence as they seek insects or are busying themselves to create a home in a tree.

And, while getting out and moving this month, it’s the perfect time to go back and revisit Smith’s Island and Wildcat Den State Park again.

“Step out and wander slowly amongst the forest’s new growth. Spring is here, quietly presenting one color, one flower at a time.” Teri Stickler

Links of interest (all links open in new tabs/windows)…

Wildflowers:

Devils Glen Park:

Check out Teri and Kaia’s pictures …

By Teri Stickler and her Samoyed, Kaia

Spring is here and we find ourselves in the oak forest of Bettendorf’s first city park. In 1937 the Bettendorf Park Board purchased 40 acres of land bordering Duck Creek. There is no firm understanding as to the naming of this park, but some rumor that Devils Glen got its name from Native American beliefs that a devil lived in its limestone caves.

“There is pleasure in the pathless woods…”  Lord Byron

Located just off State Street, on Devil’s Glen Road in Bettendorf, the park is easy to find by car, bike, or foot. It offers visitors exceptional views with its exposed limestone bluffs hugging Duck Creek. There is even a small waterfall along the Duck Creek Recreation Trail. Amenities include three shelters, (one reservable,) including grills and electricity. Also provided are public restrooms, a large fire pit, a playground, a disc golf course, and a Little League Ball Field.

Kaia and I often come to Devil’s Glen Park. Here one can get on the Duck Creek Recreation Trail and walk or bike all the way (13.5 miles out and back) to Emeis Park, Davenport or go the other way and meet up with the Mississippi Riverfront Trail (MRT). Click here for a handy, digital map. (The link will open in a new tab or window.)

Kaia and I generally just hang out in the park.

Spring has sprung.

We find springtime to be doubly rewarding as the wooded area gradually bursts with spring wildflowers. Bloodroot, snowdrops, spring beauty, hepatica, May apple, Dutchman’s breeches, all make their presence known as do the Prairie trillium that literally blankets the entire forest floor. We can barely avoid stepping on the trillium. (note: We never pick the wildflowers. They are protected species and, in some instances, even picking one flower can literally kill the entire plant.) As spring progresses, more wildflowers will appear.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Wild geranium, trout lily (dogtooth violet), sweet William, cut-leaved toothwort, Virginia waterleaf are just a few that can be found. Kaia and I like to walk slowly and take our time. For me, I am usually trying to capture some of the beauty with photography while Kaia prefers to explore every tree and fallen log, keeping an ear tuned to movement and, of course, squirrels!

And I have not even mentioned all the birds one can see and hear. The woodpeckers, for one, rap out their own presence as they seek insects or are busying themselves to create a home in a tree.

And, while getting out and moving this month, it’s the perfect time to go back and revisit Smith’s Island and Wildcat Den State Park again.

“Step out and wander slowly amongst the forest’s new growth. Spring is here, quietly presenting one color, one flower at a time.” Teri Stickler

Links of interest (all links open in new tabs/windows)…

Wildflowers:

Devils Glen Park:

Check out Teri and Kaia’s pictures …

Teri Stickler

Teri Stickler

Outdoor Blogger and Co-Adventurer

Meet Teri Stickler. Teri is a retired Quad-City teacher. She thoroughly enjoys the out-of-doors, sharing most of her adventures with her Samoyed companion, Kaia.