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Wade on the Trail with his dog

LMQC’s outdoor bloggers, Teri Stickler and Kaia, head north to Clinton to explore Eagle Point Park and explore the history, natural beauty and – of all things – a dog park!

By Teri Stickler and her Samoyed, Kaia Fall is a beautiful time of year for a little drive to Eagle Point Park, 3900 N 3rd St, Clinton, IA 52732. It’s a short 45 minutes from the Quad Cities and is well worth the trip.

LMQC Outdoor Blogger, Teri Stickler, and her faithful companion, Kaia, take a moment to enjoy a crisp, fall day.

Kaia and I went to see the beautiful fall river-views from the bluff overlook and to hike some trails, but we also found one of the best dog parks we’ve ever seen!

Eagle Point’s history

Eagle Point is a beautiful 205-acre park that began in 1888 when Elijah Buell sold his land to David and William Joyce, owners of the Clinton and Lyons Railroad. The new owners initially used mule-drawn cars run on narrow-gauge rail from Main Street to the park, but in 1891 this changed to wider tracks and electric driven cars. By 1902 an 8-mile line was run to the park. Free park admittance, but 5¢ to ride. Read more about the Park’s history here. Upon entering the park you will see a 700-pound statue of an eagle donated by the George Kramer family. In 1913 during the time the railway system was being enlarged and the main pavilion built, a wild eagle watched the work from its nest near the North Path. Thus, the name change from Joyce Park to Eagle Point Park.

Eagle Point Park today

Today’s Park is a balance of old and new. These grounds were at one time used by the Fox and Sac Indians where they would come to worship Stone Face, a natural rock formation of a man’s face. In 1937 the Stone Tower, Lodge, and Limestone footbridge were constructed by the Work Progress Administration WPA. Thereafter, a paved winding road was added as well as walking trails, three rentable picnic shelters, a playground area, sand volleyball, disc golf, bike rentals, and Prairie Pastures Dog Park and the crown jewel, the recently renovated lodge with its huge veranda built on a cliff 200 feet above the river. Here one has a 180 degree view of “Lake Clinton.” This 4–7-mile pool was created by the construction of Lock and Dam #13 on the Mississippi River.

Enjoying Prairie Pastures with your four-legged friend

Kaia is always ready for a new adventure – especially if a dog park is involved!

If you can, be sure to bring you dog with you on your visit. You will both totally enjoy Prairie Pastures Dog Park. This is one of the best dog parks we have visited. There is a membership fee, but one can purchase a daily pass for $3. The Park is huge and has several large and small dog areas including one with a pond and aeration fountain. Also available is a dog bathing area should you wish to wash your dog’s feet before leaving. A number of covered structures make it comfortable to visit in inclement weather and one of the large dog areas is so big, one could pretend they were out in the wide open spaces, but rest assured, the entire area is securely enclosed. The day we visited, Kaia checked it all out and met several very nice furry friends and their owners.

Explore the Soaring Eagle Nature Center

Worth the mention too is a nearby stop located on the entrance road to the park. Unfortunately, we were not able to stop by Soaring Eagle Nature Center this time. The center looks inviting with its 1938 barn Nature Center, one-room school house, butterfly garden, restored prairie, nature trails, and its own dog park. We hope to stop there on our next trip!

Check out Teri and Kaia’s pictures from their most recent adventure …

 

By Teri Stickler and her Samoyed, Kaia

Fall is a beautiful time of year for a little drive to Eagle Point Park, 3900 N 3rd St, Clinton, IA 52732. It’s a short 45 minutes from the Quad Cities and is well worth the trip.

LMQC Outdoor Blogger, Teri Stickler, and her faithful companion, Kaia, take a moment to enjoy a crisp, fall day.

Kaia and I went to see the beautiful fall river-views from the bluff overlook and to hike some trails, but we also found one of the best dog parks we’ve ever seen!

Eagle Point’s history

Eagle Point is a beautiful 205-acre park that began in 1888 when Elijah Buell sold his land to David and William Joyce, owners of the Clinton and Lyons Railroad. The new owners initially used mule-drawn cars run on narrow-gauge rail from Main Street to the park, but in 1891 this changed to wider tracks and electric driven cars.

By 1902 an 8-mile line was run to the park. Free park admittance, but 5¢ to ride. Read more about the Park’s history here.

Upon entering the park you will see a 700-pound statue of an eagle donated by the George Kramer family. In 1913 during the time the railway system was being enlarged and the main pavilion built, a wild eagle watched the work from its nest near the North Path. Thus, the name change from Joyce Park to Eagle Point Park.

Eagle Point Park today

Today’s Park is a balance of old and new. These grounds were at one time used by the Fox and Sac Indians where they would come to worship Stone Face, a natural rock formation of a man’s face.

In 1937 the Stone Tower, Lodge, and Limestone footbridge were constructed by the Work Progress Administration WPA.

Thereafter, a paved winding road was added as well as walking trails, three rentable picnic shelters, a playground area, sand volleyball, disc golf, bike rentals, and Prairie Pastures Dog Park and the crown jewel, the recently renovated lodge with its huge veranda built on a cliff 200 feet above the river. Here one has a 180 degree view of “Lake Clinton.” This 4–7-mile pool was created by the construction of Lock and Dam #13 on the Mississippi River.

Enjoying Prairie Pastures with your four-legged friend

Kaia is always ready for a new adventure – especially if a dog park is involved!

If you can, be sure to bring you dog with you on your visit. You will both totally enjoy Prairie Pastures Dog Park. This is one of the best dog parks we have visited. There is a membership fee, but one can purchase a daily pass for $3.

The Park is huge and has several large and small dog areas including one with a pond and aeration fountain. Also available is a dog bathing area should you wish to wash your dog’s feet before leaving. A number of covered structures make it comfortable to visit in inclement weather and one of the large dog areas is so big, one could pretend they were out in the wide open spaces, but rest assured, the entire area is securely enclosed.

The day we visited, Kaia checked it all out and met several very nice furry friends and their owners.

Explore the Soaring Eagle Nature Center

Worth the mention too is a nearby stop located on the entrance road to the park. Unfortunately, we were not able to stop by Soaring Eagle Nature Center this time. The center looks inviting with its 1938 barn Nature Center, one-room school house, butterfly garden, restored prairie, nature trails, and its own dog park.

We hope to stop there on our next trip!

Check out Teri and Kaia’s pictures from their most recent adventure …

 

Teri Stickler

Teri Stickler

Outdoor Blogger and Co-Adventurer

Meet Teri Stickler. Teri is a retired Quad-City teacher. She thoroughly enjoys the out-of-doors, sharing most of her adventures with her Samoyed companion, Kaia.